scottishlass: (Asian Antique B awww)
Reading the new J.D. Robb book Delusion In Death and this little monologue just made me all warm and fuzzy inside. That woman can write!

He took her shoulders. "Look at me. And let me tell you what I'm looking at. You're pale and shadowed. You're still trembling. So look at me, Eve, and understand I love you beyond anything and everything there is. And I need this from you."

You can say a lot about Nora Roberts aka J.D. Robb, especially as she seems to be copying herself lately in her thriller/romances but even for this little morsel, the book is already worth it.
scottishlass: (Asian Antique B awww)
Reading the new J.D. Robb book Delusion In Death and this little monologue just made me all warm and fuzzy inside. That woman can write!

He took her shoulders. "Look at me. And let me tell you what I'm looking at. You're pale and shadowed. You're still trembling. So look at me, Eve, and understand I love you beyond anything and everything there is. And I need this from you."

You can say a lot about Nora Roberts aka J.D. Robb, especially as she seems to be copying herself lately in her thriller/romances but even for this little morsel, the book is already worth it.
scottishlass: (Dogs Chica WTF?!)
As the weekend was overall shitty and I have a slight case of carpal tunnel on my right hand (hence no mouse movement or typing whatsoever) I finally started to read the first book of Twilight by Stephanie Meyer. And after one chapter I needed a drink.

Two tea cups and 2 hours later I tried to tackle the second chapter and half-way through I opted for going for a walk with the dogs IN THE FREAKING RAIN for an hour and a half instead.

Third try is the charm or so they say ... nope ... not really, but I kept at it, tried to ignore all those little inconsistencies, the bad writing AND the even worse over-editing of a zealous editor (I guess she tried her best to make this dribble even readable). OMG!!! You can actually see where the author's voice (aka own writing) leaves off and where the editor picked up and suggested complete passages. Which is bad ... very baaaaad indeed.

Anyway ... I was determined to read at least one book to see what all that hype is all about and whether or not I can gleefully continue in making fun of Twatlight.

My hunch was right ... Jesus fucking Christ on a crutch. Not only are these books written very badly from an editor's POV, they also open a whole can of worms and transport a whole unhealthy concept of true love to a whole generation of young girls.
Meyer seems to be Mormon and it comes across clearly in her books. Edward (and Jacob) are such traditionalistic, stalkerish, Mormon bastards, I doubt you find any more cliched ones in ... well Mormon literature. Heck even Amish romance novels are less cliched or full of crazy donkey shit as this one.

First ... Meyer supports the idea that a woman's/girl's sole reason for being is to be with her true love. Bella doesn't do anything in the whole book, either she mopes around or she wants to be made a vampire. She is like an empty shell without Edward.
Additionally, Meyer thinks only an abusive (aka stalker) relationship is a true love relationship. Women are property and you can transport them wherever you want, whether to make them leave their family and friends, move her to a new, foreign country or control whom she's going to meet. And have no say about it whatsoever ... but then Bella is such a weak bulb in the brain department any way (with Edward only nanoseconds behind) anyway, she wouldn't know how to talk back in the first place.

While reading all this it really gave me the creeps and some really bad flash backs to a relationship my mother had with my first stepfather. Which was abusive, harrassing and LIFE THREATENING!!!

And Meyer actually supports all this with her trilogy. What is the world coming to? It is already bad that some Japanese mangaka support abusive school girl hentai, but this is even worse. The school girl mangas are mostly read by wannabe school girl seducing men and while Meyer's drivel is read by school girls and young adults who actually think that this kind of relationship is okay. Young girls are her target group, she grooms them for hordes of unfeeling and abusive bastards who treat their girlfriends and spouses like shit and think they are the crown of evolution.

If living godly means to be abused and seen as an object, with no say or brain whatsoever, ready to be abandoned or mauled or stalked, then Miss Meyer needs a reality check.

Whoever accepted her prompt of this trilogy AND made the effort to edit the manuscript beyond any acceptable editing work should be shot and burn forever and a day in editing hell. Said editor is a very bad example of the whole trade.

OH and that book? It went straight into the trash can. I can only deal with the pollution of my brain so far, I don't need it sitting on my bookshelf side by side with authors who can actually write.

ETA: If you want to read good vampire fiction then try some of the books by Storm Constantine. Her vampires have a reason to be all mopey and introvert. Or for crying out loud read Bram Stoker's DRACULA ... now there you can actually learn something from.
scottishlass: (Dogs Chica WTF?!)
As the weekend was overall shitty and I have a slight case of carpal tunnel on my right hand (hence no mouse movement or typing whatsoever) I finally started to read the first book of Twilight by Stephanie Meyer. And after one chapter I needed a drink.

Two tea cups and 2 hours later I tried to tackle the second chapter and half-way through I opted for going for a walk with the dogs IN THE FREAKING RAIN for an hour and a half instead.

Third try is the charm or so they say ... nope ... not really, but I kept at it, tried to ignore all those little inconsistencies, the bad writing AND the even worse over-editing of a zealous editor (I guess she tried her best to make this dribble even readable). OMG!!! You can actually see where the author's voice (aka own writing) leaves off and where the editor picked up and suggested complete passages. Which is bad ... very baaaaad indeed.

Anyway ... I was determined to read at least one book to see what all that hype is all about and whether or not I can gleefully continue in making fun of Twatlight.

My hunch was right ... Jesus fucking Christ on a crutch. Not only are these books written very badly from an editor's POV, they also open a whole can of worms and transport a whole unhealthy concept of true love to a whole generation of young girls.
Meyer seems to be Mormon and it comes across clearly in her books. Edward (and Jacob) are such traditionalistic, stalkerish, Mormon bastards, I doubt you find any more cliched ones in ... well Mormon literature. Heck even Amish romance novels are less cliched or full of crazy donkey shit as this one.

First ... Meyer supports the idea that a woman's/girl's sole reason for being is to be with her true love. Bella doesn't do anything in the whole book, either she mopes around or she wants to be made a vampire. She is like an empty shell without Edward.
Additionally, Meyer thinks only an abusive (aka stalker) relationship is a true love relationship. Women are property and you can transport them wherever you want, whether to make them leave their family and friends, move her to a new, foreign country or control whom she's going to meet. And have no say about it whatsoever ... but then Bella is such a weak bulb in the brain department any way (with Edward only nanoseconds behind) anyway, she wouldn't know how to talk back in the first place.

While reading all this it really gave me the creeps and some really bad flash backs to a relationship my mother had with my first stepfather. Which was abusive, harrassing and LIFE THREATENING!!!

And Meyer actually supports all this with her trilogy. What is the world coming to? It is already bad that some Japanese mangaka support abusive school girl hentai, but this is even worse. The school girl mangas are mostly read by wannabe school girl seducing men and while Meyer's drivel is read by school girls and young adults who actually think that this kind of relationship is okay. Young girls are her target group, she grooms them for hordes of unfeeling and abusive bastards who treat their girlfriends and spouses like shit and think they are the crown of evolution.

If living godly means to be abused and seen as an object, with no say or brain whatsoever, ready to be abandoned or mauled or stalked, then Miss Meyer needs a reality check.

Whoever accepted her prompt of this trilogy AND made the effort to edit the manuscript beyond any acceptable editing work should be shot and burn forever and a day in editing hell. Said editor is a very bad example of the whole trade.

OH and that book? It went straight into the trash can. I can only deal with the pollution of my brain so far, I don't need it sitting on my bookshelf side by side with authors who can actually write.

ETA: If you want to read good vampire fiction then try some of the books by Storm Constantine. Her vampires have a reason to be all mopey and introvert. Or for crying out loud read Bram Stoker's DRACULA ... now there you can actually learn something from.
scottishlass: (Dogs Chica WTF?!)
As the weekend was overall shitty and I have a slight case of carpal tunnel on my right hand (hence no mouse movement or typing whatsoever) I finally started to read the first book of Twilight by Stephanie Meyer. And after one chapter I needed a drink.

Two tea cups and 2 hours later I tried to tackle the second chapter and half-way through I opted for going for a walk with the dogs IN THE FREAKING RAIN for an hour and a half instead.

Third try is the charm or so they say ... nope ... not really, but I kept at it, tried to ignore all those little inconsistencies, the bad writing AND the even worse over-editing of a zealous editor (I guess she tried her best to make this dribble even readable). OMG!!! You can actually see where the author's voice (aka own writing) leaves off and where the editor picked up and suggested complete passages. Which is bad ... very baaaaad indeed.

Anyway ... I was determined to read at least one book to see what all that hype is all about and whether or not I can gleefully continue in making fun of Twatlight.

My hunch was right ... Jesus fucking Christ on a crutch. Not only are these books written very badly from an editor's POV, they also open a whole can of worms and transport a whole unhealthy concept of true love to a whole generation of young girls.
Meyer seems to be Mormon and it comes across clearly in her books. Edward (and Jacob) are such traditionalistic, stalkerish, Mormon bastards, I doubt you find any more cliched ones in ... well Mormon literature. Heck even Amish romance novels are less cliched or full of crazy donkey shit as this one.

First ... Meyer supports the idea that a woman's/girl's sole reason for being is to be with her true love. Bella doesn't do anything in the whole book, either she mopes around or she wants to be made a vampire. She is like an empty shell without Edward.
Additionally, Meyer thinks only an abusive (aka stalker) relationship is a true love relationship. Women are property and you can transport them wherever you want, whether to make them leave their family and friends, move her to a new, foreign country or control whom she's going to meet. And have no say about it whatsoever ... but then Bella is such a weak bulb in the brain department any way (with Edward only nanoseconds behind) anyway, she wouldn't know how to talk back in the first place.

While reading all this it really gave me the creeps and some really bad flash backs to a relationship my mother had with my first stepfather. Which was abusive, harrassing and LIFE THREATENING!!!

And Meyer actually supports all this with her trilogy. What is the world coming to? It is already bad that some Japanese mangaka support abusive school girl hentai, but this is even worse. The school girl mangas are mostly read by wannabe school girl seducing men and while Meyer's drivel is read by school girls and young adults who actually think that this kind of relationship is okay. Young girls are her target group, she grooms them for hordes of unfeeling and abusive bastards who treat their girlfriends and spouses like shit and think they are the crown of evolution.

If living godly means to be abused and seen as an object, with no say or brain whatsoever, ready to be abandoned or mauled or stalked, then Miss Meyer needs a reality check.

Whoever accepted her prompt of this trilogy AND made the effort to edit the manuscript beyond any acceptable editing work should be shot and burn forever and a day in editing hell. Said editor is a very bad example of the whole trade.

OH and that book? It went straight into the trash can. I can only deal with the pollution of my brain so far, I don't need it sitting on my bookshelf side by side with authors who can actually write.

ETA: If you want to read good vampire fiction then try some of the books by Storm Constantine. Her vampires have a reason to be all mopey and introvert. Or for crying out loud read Bram Stoker's DRACULA ... now there you can actually learn something from.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know when ppl ask me about my favourite book, most ppl will probably think I'd answer with Lord of the Rings or To The Lighthouse. But I won't mention these, nor even with my childhood favourites like Winnie the Pooh or The Dark Is Rising. No, none of these.

My favourite book was first published in 1967 (my birth year) and is sadly out of print. Drei Tage und kein Ende (Three days and no ending) by Cili Wethekam. She was a German popular children's book author and unfortunately her books never got translated :( But Drei Tage und kein Ende (alibris link) is a wonderful book, full of wonder and which I feel compelled to read every year at least once. I still have one of the second edition prints from 1967 and the book is already falling apart but what the heck, reading it is like visiting a familiar friend. It makes me all teary-eyed and warm with the fuzzies :)

The book opens to show us Family Helgers, a typical after war 1960's family. Dad Helgers is a graphic designer, Mom Helgers a stay at home mom for their three children Kathrin (the eldest with 18), Jules (Julia) a pesky 13 year old and little Saskia, at 10 a very good student. For each very good grade Saskia is allowed to ask for something and usually she asks for a cinema trip with her sister Jules. But not this time. Shortly before Christmas a French boy's choir stops in their city and the choir is looking for families taking care of the boys for the time they are in town. Saskia requests for a temporary son for her father and it is agreed they will take in a young boy for three days.

Frederic isn't the usual well kempt boy everyone expects. His father, who was a German POW in France, died leaving him with his stepmother in Paris. He has crummy teeth, squinted eyes and has to wear thick glasses. But he is the soloist of the choir, his voice being remarkable. He looks more like a scarecrow than a boy, but Family Helgers fall head over heels for their little French exchange son and Frederic falls in love with his famille.

The book continues to tell how the bond between the family and their temporary son grows stronger and stronger not only in the three days he stays with them but also afterwards and that they visit him in Paris and also take him on vacation down to the Loire Castles.

Of course Frederic harbours a secret. Since his last tour he has lost his singing voice and as he doesn't want to be a hindrance to his stepmother Mado puts all his effort into making his family realize that they should take them in as an adopted son.

It sounds a bit corny when reading my summary above but the book is well written and Frederic with his Frenchized German is just adorable.
A must read IMHO, as it doesn't feel like a mere children's book but that of a tale of love, family and knowing where one belongs.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know when ppl ask me about my favourite book, most ppl will probably think I'd answer with Lord of the Rings or To The Lighthouse. But I won't mention these, nor even with my childhood favourites like Winnie the Pooh or The Dark Is Rising. No, none of these.

My favourite book was first published in 1967 (my birth year) and is sadly out of print. Drei Tage und kein Ende (Three days and no ending) by Cili Wethekam. She was a German popular children's book author and unfortunately her books never got translated :( But Drei Tage und kein Ende (alibris link) is a wonderful book, full of wonder and which I feel compelled to read every year at least once. I still have one of the second edition prints from 1967 and the book is already falling apart but what the heck, reading it is like visiting a familiar friend. It makes me all teary-eyed and warm with the fuzzies :)

The book opens to show us Family Helgers, a typical after war 1960's family. Dad Helgers is a graphic designer, Mom Helgers a stay at home mom for their three children Kathrin (the eldest with 18), Jules (Julia) a pesky 13 year old and little Saskia, at 10 a very good student. For each very good grade Saskia is allowed to ask for something and usually she asks for a cinema trip with her sister Jules. But not this time. Shortly before Christmas a French boy's choir stops in their city and the choir is looking for families taking care of the boys for the time they are in town. Saskia requests for a temporary son for her father and it is agreed they will take in a young boy for three days.

Frederic isn't the usual well kempt boy everyone expects. His father, who was a German POW in France, died leaving him with his stepmother in Paris. He has crummy teeth, squinted eyes and has to wear thick glasses. But he is the soloist of the choir, his voice being remarkable. He looks more like a scarecrow than a boy, but Family Helgers fall head over heels for their little French exchange son and Frederic falls in love with his famille.

The book continues to tell how the bond between the family and their temporary son grows stronger and stronger not only in the three days he stays with them but also afterwards and that they visit him in Paris and also take him on vacation down to the Loire Castles.

Of course Frederic harbours a secret. Since his last tour he has lost his singing voice and as he doesn't want to be a hindrance to his stepmother Mado puts all his effort into making his family realize that they should take them in as an adopted son.

It sounds a bit corny when reading my summary above but the book is well written and Frederic with his Frenchized German is just adorable.
A must read IMHO, as it doesn't feel like a mere children's book but that of a tale of love, family and knowing where one belongs.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know when ppl ask me about my favourite book, most ppl will probably think I'd answer with Lord of the Rings or To The Lighthouse. But I won't mention these, nor even with my childhood favourites like Winnie the Pooh or The Dark Is Rising. No, none of these.

My favourite book was first published in 1967 (my birth year) and is sadly out of print. Drei Tage und kein Ende (Three days and no ending) by Cili Wethekam. She was a German popular children's book author and unfortunately her books never got translated :( But Drei Tage und kein Ende (alibris link) is a wonderful book, full of wonder and which I feel compelled to read every year at least once. I still have one of the second edition prints from 1967 and the book is already falling apart but what the heck, reading it is like visiting a familiar friend. It makes me all teary-eyed and warm with the fuzzies :)

The book opens to show us Family Helgers, a typical after war 1960's family. Dad Helgers is a graphic designer, Mom Helgers a stay at home mom for their three children Kathrin (the eldest with 18), Jules (Julia) a pesky 13 year old and little Saskia, at 10 a very good student. For each very good grade Saskia is allowed to ask for something and usually she asks for a cinema trip with her sister Jules. But not this time. Shortly before Christmas a French boy's choir stops in their city and the choir is looking for families taking care of the boys for the time they are in town. Saskia requests for a temporary son for her father and it is agreed they will take in a young boy for three days.

Frederic isn't the usual well kempt boy everyone expects. His father, who was a German POW in France, died leaving him with his stepmother in Paris. He has crummy teeth, squinted eyes and has to wear thick glasses. But he is the soloist of the choir, his voice being remarkable. He looks more like a scarecrow than a boy, but Family Helgers fall head over heels for their little French exchange son and Frederic falls in love with his famille.

The book continues to tell how the bond between the family and their temporary son grows stronger and stronger not only in the three days he stays with them but also afterwards and that they visit him in Paris and also take him on vacation down to the Loire Castles.

Of course Frederic harbours a secret. Since his last tour he has lost his singing voice and as he doesn't want to be a hindrance to his stepmother Mado puts all his effort into making his family realize that they should take them in as an adopted son.

It sounds a bit corny when reading my summary above but the book is well written and Frederic with his Frenchized German is just adorable.
A must read IMHO, as it doesn't feel like a mere children's book but that of a tale of love, family and knowing where one belongs.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Okay, this book this time has only been published in German so far and I think only Germans will be interested in it. I have read it in May, before the hype hit the press.

The author of the book is one of Germany's top comedians and he is liked by both young and old, het and gay (he himself is gay and is out of the closet for decades now). HaPe Kerkeling is seen as the funny guy who portrays all these weirdo characters that seem to be so typical for Germany and even though in interviews he comes across as quite an intellectual, I was more than surprised about his first foray into writing:

Ich bin dann mal weg (Take care, I'm off then) is a sometimes funny, sometimes pithy rendition of his pilgrimage on the St. James Way from France to Santiago de Compostela in Northern Spain. 800 kilometres through the Spanish plains and wilderness and the beautiful yet troubled mountains of the Basque region.

I got interested in it as I had been to the same pilgramage about 12 years ago with some co-students as some kind of dare - so seeing that Ha Pe who is a self-proclaimed couch potatoe had done the same as I did (when I was still a bit more sporty) I was curious of how he had experience this pilgramage. As he is also non-religious but spiritual like me, I had to have the book.

I read it in one go and I laughed and smiled, I sometimes shook my head in wonder or nodded in agreement. The people he met, the things he experienced ... it all had a ring of truth, a sense of remembrance that touched me. It is a deeply spiritual book in a non-religious way. Of course, being on a pilgramage it has religious over-tones but Kerkeling finds a way to keep all the religious and especially the Roman-Catholic connotations at a minimum. He makes fun, he puts on trial but with a lightness and some sort of playfullness that entertains but also makes you think.
He describes all things human, and how he reacts to it. The 320 pages strong book, enriched with some nice photos, is an excellent and very detailed travel guide. Even though the book is more or less about God, religion, re-incarnation (a topic that the yellow press took up gratefully) and the central question of "who am I?" Kerkeling's thoughts in his daily vignettes are poignant and show the cheekiness of the author, here is an example from July 3rd : "Sometimes it is most reasonable to be simply unreasonable!"

If you read this book it will touch you on many levels, it will give you an inside on one of Germany's famous celebrities, it will touch your own spirituality and it will make you want to pick up a walking-staff and go all the 800 kilometres yourself, following the St. James Way.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Okay, this book this time has only been published in German so far and I think only Germans will be interested in it. I have read it in May, before the hype hit the press.

The author of the book is one of Germany's top comedians and he is liked by both young and old, het and gay (he himself is gay and is out of the closet for decades now). HaPe Kerkeling is seen as the funny guy who portrays all these weirdo characters that seem to be so typical for Germany and even though in interviews he comes across as quite an intellectual, I was more than surprised about his first foray into writing:

Ich bin dann mal weg (Take care, I'm off then) is a sometimes funny, sometimes pithy rendition of his pilgrimage on the St. James Way from France to Santiago de Compostela in Northern Spain. 800 kilometres through the Spanish plains and wilderness and the beautiful yet troubled mountains of the Basque region.

I got interested in it as I had been to the same pilgramage about 12 years ago with some co-students as some kind of dare - so seeing that Ha Pe who is a self-proclaimed couch potatoe had done the same as I did (when I was still a bit more sporty) I was curious of how he had experience this pilgramage. As he is also non-religious but spiritual like me, I had to have the book.

I read it in one go and I laughed and smiled, I sometimes shook my head in wonder or nodded in agreement. The people he met, the things he experienced ... it all had a ring of truth, a sense of remembrance that touched me. It is a deeply spiritual book in a non-religious way. Of course, being on a pilgramage it has religious over-tones but Kerkeling finds a way to keep all the religious and especially the Roman-Catholic connotations at a minimum. He makes fun, he puts on trial but with a lightness and some sort of playfullness that entertains but also makes you think.
He describes all things human, and how he reacts to it. The 320 pages strong book, enriched with some nice photos, is an excellent and very detailed travel guide. Even though the book is more or less about God, religion, re-incarnation (a topic that the yellow press took up gratefully) and the central question of "who am I?" Kerkeling's thoughts in his daily vignettes are poignant and show the cheekiness of the author, here is an example from July 3rd : "Sometimes it is most reasonable to be simply unreasonable!"

If you read this book it will touch you on many levels, it will give you an inside on one of Germany's famous celebrities, it will touch your own spirituality and it will make you want to pick up a walking-staff and go all the 800 kilometres yourself, following the St. James Way.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Okay, this book this time has only been published in German so far and I think only Germans will be interested in it. I have read it in May, before the hype hit the press.

The author of the book is one of Germany's top comedians and he is liked by both young and old, het and gay (he himself is gay and is out of the closet for decades now). HaPe Kerkeling is seen as the funny guy who portrays all these weirdo characters that seem to be so typical for Germany and even though in interviews he comes across as quite an intellectual, I was more than surprised about his first foray into writing:

Ich bin dann mal weg (Take care, I'm off then) is a sometimes funny, sometimes pithy rendition of his pilgrimage on the St. James Way from France to Santiago de Compostela in Northern Spain. 800 kilometres through the Spanish plains and wilderness and the beautiful yet troubled mountains of the Basque region.

I got interested in it as I had been to the same pilgramage about 12 years ago with some co-students as some kind of dare - so seeing that Ha Pe who is a self-proclaimed couch potatoe had done the same as I did (when I was still a bit more sporty) I was curious of how he had experience this pilgramage. As he is also non-religious but spiritual like me, I had to have the book.

I read it in one go and I laughed and smiled, I sometimes shook my head in wonder or nodded in agreement. The people he met, the things he experienced ... it all had a ring of truth, a sense of remembrance that touched me. It is a deeply spiritual book in a non-religious way. Of course, being on a pilgramage it has religious over-tones but Kerkeling finds a way to keep all the religious and especially the Roman-Catholic connotations at a minimum. He makes fun, he puts on trial but with a lightness and some sort of playfullness that entertains but also makes you think.
He describes all things human, and how he reacts to it. The 320 pages strong book, enriched with some nice photos, is an excellent and very detailed travel guide. Even though the book is more or less about God, religion, re-incarnation (a topic that the yellow press took up gratefully) and the central question of "who am I?" Kerkeling's thoughts in his daily vignettes are poignant and show the cheekiness of the author, here is an example from July 3rd : "Sometimes it is most reasonable to be simply unreasonable!"

If you read this book it will touch you on many levels, it will give you an inside on one of Germany's famous celebrities, it will touch your own spirituality and it will make you want to pick up a walking-staff and go all the 800 kilometres yourself, following the St. James Way.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know ... seldomly I have been so indifferent to a book as I was to the new one by Nora Roberts. Usually, she either leaves me ecstatic or disappointed with her books, but never indifferent ... until now.

So what is it about Angel's Fall that didn't grip me? I mean I have read the book from cover to cover in just 24 hours and the book has about 480 pages. I really can't put a finger on it. But first things first:

Summary:
After being the sole survivor of a shooting in a restaurant, cordon bleu chef Reece Gilmour slowly patches her life back together. Driving from town to town, working in diners and other greasy spoons, she is a bundle of nerves and paranoia, running away from the violent shooting she only survived barely two years ago.
When she comes to the Wyoming town Angels Fist, she is strangely drawn to it and for the first time in over a year, she has the urge to settle down, even if it is only for a few weeks. She not only finds a job, but a home, love and the semblance of stability and sanity. Until the day she witnesses the murder of a woman up in the mountains.
Her hard fought stability is shattered by events that question her own sanity and chips away at her sense of self and her reputation in town. Is the murderer after her, or does she only imagine things?

Review:
I have to admit, never was it as hard as with this book to get through the first third of it. I really had to force myself through the descriptions of town life and Reece first steps to healing. Only when the first stalking occurs (after the murder) I got hooked on the plot. From then on it was not an easy but an enjoyable read.
Unfortunately, half-way through I suspected who had killed the woman. So the ending was not so surprising anymore.
Did I like the book? I guess I do ... though I still feel a bit on the undecided side of it. It's not one of Nora's best books, but it is also not a stinker as it is well researched (depression, guilt, paranoia) and a good read once you get into the rythm of things, but somehow the characters left me untouched.
So, yeah we have poor victimized Reece who almost died in the cleaning cupboard of her kitchen, I felt a bit of compassion for and with her but the others .... either they were coming too short (Joanie) or they were redundant (like Lo). And somehow her male heros are one long string of tall, dark, handsome (though it was a nice touch that he didn't have too sensitive a side) It seems Nora Roberts copies herself. The plot itself is nothing to write home about. Okay, so it has a bit of depth here and there, and offers oh-kay sub-characters, but considering what she has written over the past years, it only seems like a bad copy of her own work. I guess it was bound to happen some day. She has been writing since 1981 and sooner or later she had to fall back on ideas she had already used in books before.

All in all, a good summer read. But hopefully her new trilogy (Celtic Circle) and Born In Death will be much better - well it better be because Born In Death was postponed to November because of this mediocre book called Angel's Fall.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know ... seldomly I have been so indifferent to a book as I was to the new one by Nora Roberts. Usually, she either leaves me ecstatic or disappointed with her books, but never indifferent ... until now.

So what is it about Angel's Fall that didn't grip me? I mean I have read the book from cover to cover in just 24 hours and the book has about 480 pages. I really can't put a finger on it. But first things first:

Summary:
After being the sole survivor of a shooting in a restaurant, cordon bleu chef Reece Gilmour slowly patches her life back together. Driving from town to town, working in diners and other greasy spoons, she is a bundle of nerves and paranoia, running away from the violent shooting she only survived barely two years ago.
When she comes to the Wyoming town Angels Fist, she is strangely drawn to it and for the first time in over a year, she has the urge to settle down, even if it is only for a few weeks. She not only finds a job, but a home, love and the semblance of stability and sanity. Until the day she witnesses the murder of a woman up in the mountains.
Her hard fought stability is shattered by events that question her own sanity and chips away at her sense of self and her reputation in town. Is the murderer after her, or does she only imagine things?

Review:
I have to admit, never was it as hard as with this book to get through the first third of it. I really had to force myself through the descriptions of town life and Reece first steps to healing. Only when the first stalking occurs (after the murder) I got hooked on the plot. From then on it was not an easy but an enjoyable read.
Unfortunately, half-way through I suspected who had killed the woman. So the ending was not so surprising anymore.
Did I like the book? I guess I do ... though I still feel a bit on the undecided side of it. It's not one of Nora's best books, but it is also not a stinker as it is well researched (depression, guilt, paranoia) and a good read once you get into the rythm of things, but somehow the characters left me untouched.
So, yeah we have poor victimized Reece who almost died in the cleaning cupboard of her kitchen, I felt a bit of compassion for and with her but the others .... either they were coming too short (Joanie) or they were redundant (like Lo). And somehow her male heros are one long string of tall, dark, handsome (though it was a nice touch that he didn't have too sensitive a side) It seems Nora Roberts copies herself. The plot itself is nothing to write home about. Okay, so it has a bit of depth here and there, and offers oh-kay sub-characters, but considering what she has written over the past years, it only seems like a bad copy of her own work. I guess it was bound to happen some day. She has been writing since 1981 and sooner or later she had to fall back on ideas she had already used in books before.

All in all, a good summer read. But hopefully her new trilogy (Celtic Circle) and Born In Death will be much better - well it better be because Born In Death was postponed to November because of this mediocre book called Angel's Fall.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
You know ... seldomly I have been so indifferent to a book as I was to the new one by Nora Roberts. Usually, she either leaves me ecstatic or disappointed with her books, but never indifferent ... until now.

So what is it about Angel's Fall that didn't grip me? I mean I have read the book from cover to cover in just 24 hours and the book has about 480 pages. I really can't put a finger on it. But first things first:

Summary:
After being the sole survivor of a shooting in a restaurant, cordon bleu chef Reece Gilmour slowly patches her life back together. Driving from town to town, working in diners and other greasy spoons, she is a bundle of nerves and paranoia, running away from the violent shooting she only survived barely two years ago.
When she comes to the Wyoming town Angels Fist, she is strangely drawn to it and for the first time in over a year, she has the urge to settle down, even if it is only for a few weeks. She not only finds a job, but a home, love and the semblance of stability and sanity. Until the day she witnesses the murder of a woman up in the mountains.
Her hard fought stability is shattered by events that question her own sanity and chips away at her sense of self and her reputation in town. Is the murderer after her, or does she only imagine things?

Review:
I have to admit, never was it as hard as with this book to get through the first third of it. I really had to force myself through the descriptions of town life and Reece first steps to healing. Only when the first stalking occurs (after the murder) I got hooked on the plot. From then on it was not an easy but an enjoyable read.
Unfortunately, half-way through I suspected who had killed the woman. So the ending was not so surprising anymore.
Did I like the book? I guess I do ... though I still feel a bit on the undecided side of it. It's not one of Nora's best books, but it is also not a stinker as it is well researched (depression, guilt, paranoia) and a good read once you get into the rythm of things, but somehow the characters left me untouched.
So, yeah we have poor victimized Reece who almost died in the cleaning cupboard of her kitchen, I felt a bit of compassion for and with her but the others .... either they were coming too short (Joanie) or they were redundant (like Lo). And somehow her male heros are one long string of tall, dark, handsome (though it was a nice touch that he didn't have too sensitive a side) It seems Nora Roberts copies herself. The plot itself is nothing to write home about. Okay, so it has a bit of depth here and there, and offers oh-kay sub-characters, but considering what she has written over the past years, it only seems like a bad copy of her own work. I guess it was bound to happen some day. She has been writing since 1981 and sooner or later she had to fall back on ideas she had already used in books before.

All in all, a good summer read. But hopefully her new trilogy (Celtic Circle) and Born In Death will be much better - well it better be because Born In Death was postponed to November because of this mediocre book called Angel's Fall.
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Just finished Conversations with the fat girl by Liza Palmer and I have to say, since Jennifer Crusie's Bet Me I haven't enjoyed a book this much even if the book is written in first person narrator AND present tense (something I really don't like and my prof at university thought it is the downfall of all literary greatness 'lol'). It takes skill to write in present tense, and clearly this author has the skill.

We meet Maggie, a chubby young woman of almost 28 years who has a BA in Arts and MA in art restauration but works in a coffeeshop and lives with her dysfunctional dog Solo.

Over the years she had several crushes and one or two dysfunctional relationships. Everyone around her seems to get on with their lives, except for Maggie. Even her best friend formerly fat Olivia who is now an illusive size 2 has met her dream man and is about to marry ... and Maggie is to be the maid of honour. But as Maggie changes her life and takes the plunge to actually work in her studied profession, after she is forced to move homes on a 48 hours eviction, the fat girl in the duo realizes that best thick friends at 12 might not survive a thin relationship at 28.
Cut for possible spoilers )
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Just finished Conversations with the fat girl by Liza Palmer and I have to say, since Jennifer Crusie's Bet Me I haven't enjoyed a book this much even if the book is written in first person narrator AND present tense (something I really don't like and my prof at university thought it is the downfall of all literary greatness 'lol'). It takes skill to write in present tense, and clearly this author has the skill.

We meet Maggie, a chubby young woman of almost 28 years who has a BA in Arts and MA in art restauration but works in a coffeeshop and lives with her dysfunctional dog Solo.

Over the years she had several crushes and one or two dysfunctional relationships. Everyone around her seems to get on with their lives, except for Maggie. Even her best friend formerly fat Olivia who is now an illusive size 2 has met her dream man and is about to marry ... and Maggie is to be the maid of honour. But as Maggie changes her life and takes the plunge to actually work in her studied profession, after she is forced to move homes on a 48 hours eviction, the fat girl in the duo realizes that best thick friends at 12 might not survive a thin relationship at 28.
Cut for possible spoilers )
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
Just finished Conversations with the fat girl by Liza Palmer and I have to say, since Jennifer Crusie's Bet Me I haven't enjoyed a book this much even if the book is written in first person narrator AND present tense (something I really don't like and my prof at university thought it is the downfall of all literary greatness 'lol'). It takes skill to write in present tense, and clearly this author has the skill.

We meet Maggie, a chubby young woman of almost 28 years who has a BA in Arts and MA in art restauration but works in a coffeeshop and lives with her dysfunctional dog Solo.

Over the years she had several crushes and one or two dysfunctional relationships. Everyone around her seems to get on with their lives, except for Maggie. Even her best friend formerly fat Olivia who is now an illusive size 2 has met her dream man and is about to marry ... and Maggie is to be the maid of honour. But as Maggie changes her life and takes the plunge to actually work in her studied profession, after she is forced to move homes on a 48 hours eviction, the fat girl in the duo realizes that best thick friends at 12 might not survive a thin relationship at 28.
Cut for possible spoilers )
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
WOHOO ... got the newest of the In Death series on Saturday and finished it just now.
Okay, so I ranted about the last one of the In Death series and that I thought Nora (aka J.D. Robb) was loosing it and I have to admit I guess she took her fan's rants a bit to her heart and tried, mind you, to make this round a bit better. It is a step up .. but as she took about two steps back with her last one, this one is only slightly better.Cut for possible spoilers )
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
WOHOO ... got the newest of the In Death series on Saturday and finished it just now.
Okay, so I ranted about the last one of the In Death series and that I thought Nora (aka J.D. Robb) was loosing it and I have to admit I guess she took her fan's rants a bit to her heart and tried, mind you, to make this round a bit better. It is a step up .. but as she took about two steps back with her last one, this one is only slightly better.Cut for possible spoilers )
scottishlass: (KS Lee Joon-ki read)
WOHOO ... got the newest of the In Death series on Saturday and finished it just now.
Okay, so I ranted about the last one of the In Death series and that I thought Nora (aka J.D. Robb) was loosing it and I have to admit I guess she took her fan's rants a bit to her heart and tried, mind you, to make this round a bit better. It is a step up .. but as she took about two steps back with her last one, this one is only slightly better.Cut for possible spoilers )

of the moment

Yozora no mukou ni wa mou asu ga matteiru

ano toki kimi ga ushinatta mono wa
yozora no mukou no hoshi ni natta
nurashita hoho wa itsuka kawaite
kitto habatakeru kara

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